Vol. 111 No. 1 (2017)
Research Papers

Environment-driven spatial pattern of tamarind trees in riparian forests

Adandé Belarmain Fandohan
Ecole de Foresterie et Ingénierie du Bois, Université d'Agriculture de Kétou
Bio
Akomian Fortuné Azihou
Laboratoire d’Ecologie Appliquée, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d’Abomey-Calavi
Bio
Achille Ephrem Assogbadjo
Laboratoire d’Ecologie Appliquée, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d’Abomey-Calavi
Bio
Noël Houédougbé Fonton
Laboratoire d’Étude et de Recherche en Statistique Appliquée et Biométrie, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d’Abomey-Calavi
Bio
Augustin Brice Sinsin
Laboratoire d’Ecologie Appliquée, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d’Abomey-Calavi
Bio
Patrick van Damme
Laboratory of Tropical and Sub-Tropical Agriculture and Ethnobotany, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, University of Ghent, Ghent
Published June 29, 2017
How to Cite
Fandohan, A. B., Azihou, A. F., Assogbadjo, A. E., Fonton, N. H., Sinsin, A. B., & van Damme, P. (2017). Environment-driven spatial pattern of tamarind trees in riparian forests. Journal of Agriculture and Environment for International Development (JAEID), 111(1), 23-37. https://doi.org/10.12895/jaeid.20171.499

Abstract

Domesticating indigenous agroforestry species is gaining interest as a potential option for conservation and production. Yet, spatial patterning of key species and how it is altered by environmental conditions, which are important to design plantation schemes in forest and agroforestry systems, are still poorly documented. The pair-correlation function was used to assess spatial pattern of Tamarindus indica and its variation under contrasting environmental conditions (vegetation cover and soil degradation). Tamarind seeds being dispersed by zoochory and barochory, we hypothesized positive association within and among life stages (adults-adults, juveniles-juveniles, and adults-juveniles). Environmental conditions did not significantly affect density and overall spatial pattern of either adult or juvenile trees. Adults and juveniles confirmed clumped patterns irrespective of environmental conditions. However, juveniles showed positive association with adults under lower canopy cover and/or soil degradation, and otherwise, independence from adults. Adults seemed to have allelopathic effect on juveniles under dense canopy. On the contrary, soil degradation favored attraction between adults and juveniles, presumably by inducing coppicing. Tamarind could be used to restore degraded areas. To this end, we suggest introducing juveniles in patches of 40 m radius using a 10 m x 10 m planting grid, and at least 30 m from mature trees.